Sunday, June 12, 2016

"weaponized intertextuality"

screencap from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QeAKX_0wZWY
In this new generation of films
more and more
the intertextual manifests itself as
objects, people, or situations
specifically meant to trigger an emotional response in the viewer
...
I don’t think franchises and shared universes are bad by default
quite the opposite
at their best they build interpretive communities
and foster social bonds in an increasingly alienated world
the kind of intertextuality that we’re talking about
can reflect these good qualities
and when it’s done right
when it’s not a substitute
for strong characters and a good story
it can be funny
it can be amusingly subversive
and of course it can add to the drama
while still being exciting as hell.

1 comment:

  1. "Two extraordinary facts concerning the small bullets with holes (now dubbed type IIIs) also emerged. First, they could be successfully slung in small groups of three or four to create a form of grapeshot. This had been independently confirmed by T Richardson in his work on Roman sling-bullets at the Royal Armouries. Even more intriguingly, the mysterious holes proved to confer an aerophonic quality: in flight, these lead shot whistled, or more accurately gave off a mechanical buzzing sound eerily reminiscent of an agitated wasp (click below to hear for yourself). Remarkable as it sounds, the simplest explanation for this design modification is that it represents an early form of psychological warfare. To put it another way, the Roman attackers valued the terror that hearing the incoming bullets would instil in the defenders." - http://www.archaeology.co.uk/articles/features/burnswark.htm

    ReplyDelete