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The Phatic Workshop is all about phatics. The idea is to bring together the various fragments of phatics: the historical precedents (e.g. Malinowski's phatic communion), concomitants (e.g. Charles Morris's communization), equivalents (e.g. Jurgen Ruesch's metacommunication and Gregory Bateson's μ-function) and extensions (e.g. Julia Elyachar's concept of phatic labor).

We're attempting to piece together the tell-tale signs of a phatic turn in humanitarian and social sciences (including anthropology, semiotics, digital culture studies and, of course, computer-mediated communication).

Comments

  1. I propose that we add very short summaries of what we've learned -- a few short bullet points with the key ideas or questions. We could do this each week, which would help subsequent readers catch up, and also to help us keep track of the various "threads". If it's agreeable, we could make Wednesdays a "seminar day" and add such summaries then.

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